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Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm?

$1 by DOLPHIN in YELM, 14 hours ago
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Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis
Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis
Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis
Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis
Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis
Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm? in Fort Lewis

Hi there! Do you have extra cardboard boxes to donate to our farm?
Have you just moved and have a garage full of boxes to get rid of?
Are you eco-conscious and want to avoid the land-fills? Shopping on Amazon or online and have a lot of boxes blocking your prime space?

We are starting a small organic family farm with goats, chickens, sheep (a petting zoo) and 4 greenhouses.
We have large gardening plots and use the cardboard for the walkways in the greenhouses and then, cover them with mulch/woodchips.
Your donation shall help us greatly. We need about a 1000 pieces to flattened cardboards to lay down like tiles over-lapping and then, we cover with straw or wood-chips.

Please call our cell- ----360---489---2830--
(DOLPHIN AYUB @ DANCING GOATS AND SINGING CHICKENS ORGANIC FARM) and we shall give you address / directions on where to bring it.(place near the right side of the doors of the greenhouses, but don't block entrances or walkways.)
We have a large turn-around for trucks on the farm.


Here is a little educational item on how we use the cardboards:
Rather than using herbicides, landscape fabric, or plastic sheeting to control weeds in your garden or planting beds, try putting down cardboard instead as a green solution.

To use cardboard as a weed barrier in your garden:

Break down cardboard boxes and remove any plastic packing tape.
Lay the cardboard on the ground in your garden or planting bed.
Wet the cardboard down with a garden hose.
Cover the cardboard with a layer of mulch.
When planting, cut a hole in the cardboard for each plant.
As the cardboard breaks down over time, it makes sugar, which attracts earthworms to improve your soil.

Mulch, perhaps the workhorse of the garden, suppresses weeds, retains moisture, cools soil and some even restore nutrients to

the soil as they decompose. ... Fortunately, you can use corrugated cardboard as mulch, saving you money and recycling your

cardboard surplus at the same time.


Large pieces will not decompose as quickly. Also, soaking the cardboard in water with a bit of liquid detergent will help to

speed up the decomposition process. Begin your compost pile with a 4-inch layer of shredded corrugated cardboard with other

high-carbon materials such as straw, old hay or dead leaves.

Newspaper is safe to compost, but it breaks down quite slowly because of its high lignin content. (Lignin is a substance found in the woody cell walls of plants, and it is highly resistant to decomposition). Most newspapers today use water or soy-based inks.

Using cardboard to create new gardening space is high on the list of recommended methods promoted by Wild Ones, a non-profit advocacy organization for native plants, because smothering surface vegetation with cardboard causes less trauma to a site compared to digging it up. Many gardeners build raised beds right on their lawns, and line the bottoms with cardboard to smother the grass - a technique that makes it possible to fill the beds and start gardening right away.

Cardboard, newspaper and other compostable material is a quick and easy fix for weed problems. In just one growing season, you can reduce weeds by 75 percent or more.

Just place pieces of cardboard around the plants you want to protect. Water immediately to help the cardboard stay in place. (I say this because I've been that person chasing runaway cardboard caught by the wind.) You can add soil or mulch on top to reinforce it, too. The cardboard will suppress the weeds and eventually break down into the soil, adding useful organic

matter.

Pathway:

Creating a new garden path might seem like a lot of work, but you can have a simple one in about an hour. No, this isn't a fancy-schmancy infomercial-type promise. All you need is cardboard, bricks or something else to outline the path, and mulch. You're going to be placing the cardboard directly onto the grass or whatever other surface you're working on. Cardboard is thick enough so that you shouldn't have any stray grass or weeds poking up through it. (If you do, just add more cardboard.)

Place the cardboard in the shape you want the path to take. Outline with bricks, then cover with soil and mulch. Voilà!


Over the freshly weeded area, or right over turf that you have mown short first, simply layer on newspaper thickly, or spread out flattened corrugated cardboard as the weed-smothering underlayment. Moisten the paper and pin it down with earth staples or weigh it down with rocks, then cover with mulch. (Advice on which mulch is here; that's mine in the photo above.)

Depending on the time of year and what I am planting, I may cut Xs in the cardboard with my spade and plant immediately, then mulch after planting. This would work with substantial perennials or when making a shrub border, for instance. You can

certainly do this if you pre-weeded the area as above.

Wit

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